Student Selected for Competitive Scholar Program

Published on 15 November 2016

After attending a Pharmacy Quality Alliance (PQA) presentation about medication synchronization, hosted by the College, P3 student Benjamin Jolley was inspired to develop a med sync program for his workplace, Gateway Apothecary. The Pharmacy Quality Alliance-CVS Health Foundation Scholars program was the perfect opportunity for Jolley to put his vision into motion.

The PQA-CVS Health Foundation Scholars program is an initiative designed to foster student interest in performance measurement and quality improvement. Student pharmacists develop and submit a concept for a quality improvement project to be executed throughout the academic year with the guidance of a mentor. Students then present the results of their projects during the Pharmacy Quality Alliance (PQA) Annual Meeting in May 2017. Jolley is one of 19 students selected from across the country for the program.

“I was excited and honored to be selected as a scholar, and I was surprised by the College’s response,” Jolley said. “When I opened my email and found out I had been chosen, I had also received about a dozen emails of congratulations from the STLCOP faculty.”

Jolley has until May 2017 to implement and collect results of an appointment-based medication synchronization program at Gateway Apothecary. Gateway Apothecary is a specialty pharmacy located across the street from the College. The pharmacy provides a free delivery service and serves a large patient population. In fact, more than 50 patients receive more than five deliveries a month, or a delivery every six days.

“The goal of my project is to develop a method to consolidate the different prescription medications of each patient and refill them on the same day so they can receive them in one delivery,” Jolley said. “By consolidating refills, med sync allows the pharmacist to shift to an appointment-based system where they can evaluate a patient’s entire regimen at once and provide meaningful counseling to the patient.”

Theresa R. Prosser, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCPS, AE-C, professor of pharmacy practice, is Jolley’s mentor for the scholar program.

“Dr. Prosser has been an enormous help to me,” Jolley said. “She has a wealth of experience implementing quality improvement projects across a variety of pharmacy practice settings, from critical care to ambulatory care.”

From challenging classes and learning how to balance a demanding schedule to his position on the National Community Pharmacist Association (NCPA) Student Leadership Council and recognition as a PQA-CVS Health Foundation Scholar, Jolley credits his time at the College as a key component to his success.

“STLCOP provides me with unique experiences that form how I see the world and how I plan to practice pharmacy when I graduate,” Jolley concluded.

Explore more stories in the categories of: Academics , Community Engagement , Research , Students